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William Brown 'Exploring Bear'. Woodblock Edition of 23 21cm x 21.5cm. £275 unframed

William Brown ‘Exploring Bear’ Woodblock. Edition of 23. 21cm x 21.5cm. £275 unfram

William Brown 'Bears Having a Chat' Woodblock. Edition of 23. 23cm x 29.5cm. £275 unframed

William Brown ‘Bears Having a Chat’ Woodblock. Edition of 23. 23cm x 29.5cm. £275 unframed

William Brown 'Bears Reaching for Pears' Woodblock. Edition of 23. 21cm x 21.5cm. £275 unframed

William Brown ‘Bears Reaching for Pears’ Lino cut. Edition of 23. 18cm x 19cm. £275 unframed

We have set up a Print Room as part of our current exhibition ‘An Anthology of Work by Painters & Printmakers’Many artists, particularly painters are also printmakers. There often seems to be a natural progression. The work in this show is primarily by painters who have regularly exhibited at The Art Shop. They often produce innovative and exciting printmaking too.

Framed and unframed limited edition Lino, wood block, wood engraving, collograph & silkscreen prints are available. You can select an unframed edition and use our framing service, with a wide range of mouldings, mounts and prices.

The late William Brown – the painter of the iconic bear, whose paintings and drawings we have been fortunate to exhibit. Here is the work of an extraordinary, playful, powerful and inventive printmaker, working in lino block, wood block and silkscreen. He originally started printmaking for his friends (poets and writers). These blocks and silk screens are now with his printmaker, Pete Williams, in Cardiff who is producing runs of William’s work in small editions. Although not signed by the artist they are authenticated with a seal. These prints are very collectable and hang so well with his paintings.

Exhibitions are open to public viewing every Tuesday – Saturday, 9.15 – 17.00

 

Rachel Larkins Fusee Tired Girls 1

Rachel Larkins ‘Fusee Tired’  Automaton. Wood, brass & textiles. 22cm high x 26cm wide. £460

Rachel Larkins. Freeschool pencil box. detail

Rachel Larkins ‘Free School Pencil Box’ (detail) Automaton. Wood, brass & textiles. 22cm high x 26cm wide. £500

Rachel Larkins. brooch

Rachel Larkins ‘Death & Maiden Brooch’ Mixed media. 4cm high. £96

Rachel Larkins. Moonlight at St. Michaels

Rachel Larkins ‘Moonlight at St Michael’s’ Charcoal & ink on paper. 37 x 47cm. £270 framed

Rachel Larkins

Rachel Larkins ‘Storm and a Duel at Sea’ Automaton, glass, brass & sycamore 26cm high. £680

Rachel Larkins October graveyard

Rachel Larkins ‘October Graveyard’ charcoal & ink on paper. 37 x 47cm. £270 framed

We are so excited to have a selection of beautiful pieces from the very talented Rachel Larkins.

Her work spans an eclectic range of toys and automata to charcoal drawings and has delighted clients including the Hove Museum & Art gallery, musician PJ Harvey, foot wear design compay Jeffery West of London and Tait and Style of Orkney.

‘I began making collectors toys about fifteen years ago, from a studio at Artsway (in the New Forest) shortly after graduating in Textile Art from Winchester. I exhibit regularly and my work is held by private collections in this country and abroad. Alongside working at The Arts University at Bournemouth, I make automata to public and private commission. I am currently studying for a Masters in Sequential Design at the University of Brighton.’

tanja malo 4

Tanja Malo ‘Liberty Bracelets’ Tana Lawn, 1930’s glass buttons & hemp. £17 each

tanja malo 3

Tanja Malo ‘Indigo Bracelets Overdyed Liberty, Kimono, silk threads & hemp. £17 each

tanja malo 2

Tanja Malo ‘Kimono Bracelets’ Bound Japanese fabrics & hemp. £22 each

tanja malo 1

Tanja Malo ‘Old Key Necklace’, ‘Looking Glass Necklace’, ‘Kimono Lens Necklace’ 1920’s lens, 1960’s chain, Japanese cotton & paper box. £45, £55, £65

tanja malo 5

Tanja Malo ‘Looking Glass Necklace’ & ‘Kimono Bracelet’ 1920’s lens, 1960’s chain & paper box, bound Japanese fabrics & hemp. £55, £22

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Tanja Malo ‘Liberty Bracelet’ Tana Lawn, fabric button & hemp. £17

We are so thrilled to have work by new maker, Tanja Malo.

Tanja studied jewellery in Japan, was brought up in rural Sweden with roots in Finnish Lapland. She uses found kimono prints, hemp, nettle and raw silk from Nepalese and Laotian mountain farms, handmade silver from Sweden, both old and new Liberty of London fabric… exquisite!

‘I started collecting fabrics when I first moved to Japan in the late 90’s, and continued during many journeys throughout the Far East in the ten years that followed. The gathering and learning about materials from the people who produced and worked with them everyday led to ideas of how to use the smallest piece of fabric, threads on factory floors, and make it into something beautiful and valuable. In the process, my form of jewellery making was found: preserving what might have otherwise been lost.

These pieces are made out of these found kimono prints, odd pieces from small antique stores in border towns, hemp, nettle and raw silk from Nepalese and Laotian mountain farms, handmade silver from Sweden, both old and new Liberty of London fabric. 

Click Here to see more from The Winter Show.

Philippa Robbins. Frida. Papier mâché, gummed paper & tin foil. 64cm high.

Philippa Robbins ‘Frida’ Papier mâché, gummed paper & tin foil. 64cm high.

Philippa Robbins Bette1

Philippa Robbins ‘Bette‘ Papier mâché gummed paper, tin foil & dental cast. 52cm high

Philippa Robbins. The Prisoner. Papier mâché gummed paper, tin foil & dental cast. 52cm high

Philippa Robbins ‘The Prisoner’ Papier mâché gummed paper, tin foil & dental cast. 52cm high

A true highlight of this year’s Winter Show – Philippa Robbins “An Audience of Puppets” which inspired a series of wall based works on paper with an immediate question:

Who exactly is the audience? Is it the viewer or is it the puppets?

The puppets themselves, whether watching, or being watched, or both, are based on family and friends and made of gummed paper, taped tissue and dental casts and are then carefully clothed. Philippa is even making one of Pauline.

The subtle and all too seldom art of puppetry stirs emotions and excites curiosity. The puppets are showy, tender, humorous, intriguing, sometimes venomous and a beautiful reflection of humanity.

‘These puppets are the starting point for a forthcoming exhibition here in 2016. They are often based on real people, living and dead, but in the course of their transition from a silver foil closed armature to finished hand puppets they seem to create their own identities.’

If you interested in commissioning a puppet, Philippa will be making further puppets to add to the audience for the 2016 exhibition.